Landing Remote Jobs

You’ve got the right background, stellar credentials, and a resume that screams “Hire me!” You’d be a catch for any company. The twist is that you really want to work from home, and none of the companies advertising a remote job are calling you back.

Here’s why: You’re probably making some basic mistakes that matter a lot more when you’re applying for virtual positions. The good news is that there are quick fixes you can put into place to turn your search around for the better. So, read on for four common issues (and four easy solutions).

 

1. You’re a Ghost

By ghost, I mean you have zero web presence. Aside from your email address and its account avatar (if you have one), there are few other clues as to who you are and what you’ve done. Your LinkedIn profile is out of date and your personal website is just a domain name. Employers get a faint sense of what you’re about, but not much else.

“But I sent my resume, isn’t that enough?”

Not if you want to quickly establish trust. Think about it: These companies have expansive websites, social profiles, and web presences that go on for days. That’s because they want you to understand them. Failure to return in kind makes it difficult for them to see why you’re awesome.

 

The Quick Fix

I point to LinkedIn here because it’s free, relatively easy to set up, and it’s a social profile, blog, and personal website rolled into single platform.

My bite-sized advice is to populate your profile’s sections (especially the summary) with a least three to five lines of information each, and then share a status update once a day. It can be an article or a feel-good motivational quote—anything goes. Oh, and a solid profile picture is a must.

You’ll have a warm, fleshy profile out in the world that’ll rank highly in your search results, instead of a bag of bones.

 

2. Your Emails Are “Meh”

Super long emails. Stuffy, overly formal emails. Emails with generic cover letters in them. Emails that don’t really say anything. Typos galore. Emails you leave unanswered for days.

“Meh” covers so many things in this case.

At the end of the day, the problem is that your communication style doesn’t match that of the company or remote teams in general. People like working with people. Not robots. Not dinosaurs. Certainly not the guy delivering a 300-page dissertation on how goal-oriented he is.

To engage your readers via email and show that you “get it,” you’ve got to be concise, authentic, and snappy (read: fast!).

 

The Quick Fix

Be a copycat. Consider the tone of the job ad you’re responding to, in addition to the voice used on the company’s site. Scan the LinkedIn profile of its founder. Read the blog posts. Match the organization’s pace and vibe.

Is it business casual? Is it serious? Maybe it’s somewhere in between the two. Then, kind of like how you’d dress for an interview, be half-a-step more formal. That way, you’re balancing a message of “I’d totally fit in here” with “I still get it’s a first impression.”

Finally, match the tone in your communication with everyone you meet on the team. And if you’re volleying emails with someone from the company, pay attention to the way he or she writes, and echo the style—because maybe the hiring manager and your potential boss communicate differently. Most importantly keep your message short, because—who’s really got the time for all that jazz?

Skills That You Need When Work From Home Job

So, you’ve realized all the amazing benefits of remote working—like being able to earn a living from your living room and being more focused and effective at what you do—and you’re ready to go online and get a remote job.

Or are you? Before you go after that position, you need to know how to shine when you’re looking for a remote job. Of course, all the standard job search rules apply—have an updated and proofread resume, make sure your social media is squeaky clean, and have well thought-out questions for the interview. But employers hiring remote workers are looking for a little bit more. So, make sure you show that you have these seven key skills covered if you want to land a remote job.

 

1. Organization

When you work remotely, your boss won’t be looking over your shoulder—or even able to stop by your cubicle—to see if you’re staying on top of your tasks. You’ve got to keep yourself on track.

To prove that you always know what needs to be done and when, emphasize in your resume, application email, and interview the jobs or projects you’ve done that have required managing many moving pieces, and talk about how you kept everything coordinated.

For example, perhaps you were responsible for both creating content for the company blog and answering customer service emails—and you balanced the priorities perfectly. Or, maybe you gathered stories from contributors, contracted with the printer, and oversaw the distribution of the newsletter each month as a volunteer at your child’s school. Give the details of how you did that, and remember to refer to the tools you use—like Trello, Asana, or Basecamp for project management or Google Drive or Dropbox for collaboration—since these are exactly the kinds of tools you’ll be using for remote working.

 

2. Communication

Keeping in touch when you work remotely is absolutely crucial—think email, online chat, video meetings, and maybe phone and text messages, too.

You should be familiar with the most common tools used, and, when it comes time to contact your potential employer, you should show that you’re willing and able to use them. That means offering to have an interview via Google+ Hangouts or Skype or to jump on an online chat to go through the details of your test assignment.

You also need to have top-notch communication. Be very prompt to reply to any contact from employers. Keep your messages clear, concise, and correct (in other words, read, edit, and then proofread one more time before pressing “send”). And be extra sure you have all your equipment and home office in order well before any video calls.

 

3. Time-Consciousness

Since you’ll probably be working in a different region than at least some, if not all, of your team, you’ll have to be extra aware of time zones. And, because remote working sometimes makes it difficult to know what your co-workers are doing at any particular moment, you also need to be sensitive about using their time.

So, make a point to include dates and time zones when you suggest or agree to meetings or deadlines with an interviewer. So, if you’re in San Francisco and the company is in New York, you can say, “I’d be happy to talk with you tomorrow, Monday March 16, at 10 AM Pacific Time (San Francisco) / 1 PM Eastern Time (NYC).”

Then, when you are talking with a prospective employer, make sure that you respect the time limits set. Or, if there weren’t any set in advance, at the beginning of the conversation, say something like, “It’s great to get to talk to you. I want to make sure we can cover everything we need to—can you let me know how much time you have now?” And then be sure to wrap up the talk before then.

There are Much Reasons Working From Home

I’m a big fan of having the option to work from home, and I believe every company should offer this amenity to its employees. Sure, there are some jobs in which this isn’t possible—I can’t imagine an ER doctor operating out of his living room—but keeping employees locked up in an office building every hour of every day for no good reason just bothers me.

With that said, I don’t work from my couch all the time. Currently, I average once a week, as I have a weekly meeting that’s easier to get to if I spend the day at my apartment. But the truth is, if I didn’t have this regular commitment, I’d probably work from my apartment even less.

I know—some of you who don’t have this luxury are probably saying, “What? You’re crazy! I would stay home as often as possible if I was allowed to!” But, here’s the thing: I actually like going into the office, mainly because of these four reasons.

 

1. I Get to See My Friends

I’ve made some really great friends at my present job, and I truly enjoy spending time with them. When I go into the office, we grab coffee together, celebrate each other’s birthdays over lunch or happy hour, and even hit up the occasional group fitness class together. “Employees report that when they have friends at work, their job is more fun, enjoyable, worthwhile, and satisfying,” says Christine Riordan, President of Adelphi University.

There’s a special type of bond you can form with your colleagues that you just can’t with people outside your company. Because only they really understand the hard work you’re doing, the struggles you encounter, and the annoying emails you always get from Dave in the marketing department.

“Friends at work also form a strong social support network for each other, both personally and professionally,” says Riordan. “Whether rooting for each other on promotions, consoling each other about mistakes, giving advice, or providing support for personal situations, comradeship at work can boost an employee’s spirit and provide needed assistance.”

And, for me, it’s just a lot easier to benefit from these work friend perks when I see them in person. When I work from home, I’m missing out on that face-to-face interaction. And yes, as an ambivert, sometimes that is more than needed. But the truth is, when I decide to hunker down in my apartment for the entire day instead of making the commute, I miss my friends.

 

2. I Have a Better Desk Set-up at the Office

I live in a small one-bedroom apartment in the middle of DC. Do you know what that means? It means that when I work from home, I’m crammed onto my tiny kitchen table in our dining room (a.k.a., the far right corner of our living room).

Hunching over my tiny laptop and trying to maneuver the seven to 10 different documents I usually have open at one time is really not that easy and often proves to be pretty inefficient. While I’m pretty certain that I could be much more productive at home if I had a proper work space, I also know that as it stands now, my employer has provided me a better one than I’ve provided myself. At the office, I have two monitors to utilize (it’s amazing what a difference that can make when you have to compare Excel sheet upon Excel sheet), and a desk that moves from sitting to standing.

 

3. I Can Disconnect More Easily

When I bring my laptop home from the office, the lines begin to blur. A lot. I decided not to have work email on my phone—it’s not required, and my company doesn’t pay for my phone, so why should I? This means that when I leave the office, I actually leave work, instead of checking my email for the entire metro ride home, while exercising, while eating dinner—you get the picture.

Removing that feature from my phone made it a heck of a lot easier to disconnect, something that’s vital for everyone, from entry-level to CEO. As Alice G. Walton, PhD, a science and health writer for Forbes, says, “continuing to communicate with colleagues after hours not only creates stress, but it prevents your brain from relaxing and recouping from a long work day in preparation for the next.”

And it’s true (for me, at least). Last night when I returned home from grabbing a quick drink with a friend, my laptop was open and staring at me from the table. Though it was almost 8 PM and I said to myself, “Abby, you were done three hours ago. You have nothing more to do tonight,” the dreaded thing still beckoned me over, silently convincing me that I needed to make sure no top secret emails came through (I’ll let you in on a spoiler: They never do). And after I checked, I was not only annoyed, but I was then thinking about work. Again. Hadn’t I spend enough time thinking about it already?

Full Time Freelancer Could Ever Need

According to the Freelancer’s Union, as of Fall 2015, almost 54 million Americans considered themselves freelancers, and nearly two-thirds of those people “made the jump by choice.”

But interestingly, the results of a 2015 survey conducted by Contently show that only about one-third of freelancers would decline “a full-time job in [their] field, with identical pay plus benefits…” Part of that may stem from the fact that, along with the perks respondents identified—like making their own hours and choosing what they work on—there are also concrete challenges. One-third of those surveyed listed “securing enough work” as their greatest struggle, and another 14% indicated they had trouble making enough money.

If you are (or would like to be) a full-time freelancer, you’ll need to prepare for and address the real issues that might come your way so you can be as successful as possible. Luckily, there are a ton of resources out there to support you in your endeavor—and we’ve gathered them all in one place:

 

Getting Started

You have a talent or skill that’s in demand. Colleagues and friends alike ask you if you’ll proofread their work, if you’ll design a logo for their latest ventures, if you’ll share your marketing expertise, if you’ll photograph their events, or if you’ll explain the latest social media trends. You know you could be charging for that thing you’re particularly good at, and you find the idea of freelancing pretty enticing.

Before you jump in with both feet, remember that working for yourself means more than wearing whatever you please and not having to share the team fridge. You’ll want to think through where you’ll work (Do you have a designated area at home, complete with a desk? Does it make sense to invest in a co-working space?), what hours you’ll keep (so you don’t get pulled into errands and lunches you really don’t have time for), and other seemingly small but super important things like having a phone plan that accommodates lengthy client calls and dependable Wi-Fi.

I’d recommend reading this article by Kate Kendall, the founder of the “talent marketplace” CloudPeeps. Kendall lays out a feasible plan for analyzing what separates you from the pack, finding your first clients, and getting real about just how paltry your income may be (at least initially).

 

Finding Work

Per Kendall’s suggestion, it’s a good idea to drum up some work as soon as possible—even before making the move from part-time to full-time freelancing. (And even if you’ve already been at it for a while, it’s never too late to revisit how you can gain traction and find additional work.) Check out these resources on finding clients and promoting your services.

 

1. On Job Boards

Sites like UpWork, CloudPeeps, and Mediabistro post freelancing jobs in a variety of fields often related to editorial, marketing, and social media. Business News Daily compiled an awesome list of the best freelancing sites to look for work including FlexJobs and Guru. And of course, The Muse features flexible and remote postings as well.

If you’re a full-time freelance writer, the site freelance writing jobs posts a roundup of opportunities each weekday and conducted a survey that’s a good reminder you can also find freelancing projects on more generalized sites like Craigslist and Indeed. The Mix from Hearst pays writers for personal essays they choose to publish, and getting a byline on a site like Cosmopolitan, Elle, or Seventeen is great for credibility.

 

2. Through Your Website and Social Media Profiles

Along with looking for opportunities, you also want to make sure that clients can find you—and that when they do, they’re impressed by what they see.

Your first stop is a killer personal website, and The Muse has many helpful articles on using Squarespace. (I know: I poured over them when I decided I was ready to migrate from a Blogger site.) Here are some of my personal favorites:

  • Your Step-by-Step Guide to Building Your Personal Website in a Week is the perfect jumping off point if you don’t have a website yet.
  • Our 24 Favorite One Page Personal Websites Will Inspire You to Create Your Own is a great example of how you can impress clients with just one page.
  • The Fun Activity You Can Do Now to Supercharge Your Career Next Year is a must-read for professionals who are looking for new ways to optimize their site and visually show clients how much they’ve accomplished.

Along with reviewing your website, prospective clients are likely to check out your social media profiles as well. To get yours up to speed, read up on optimizing your Instagram presence, revising your LinkedIn profile in 30 minutes, and following basic Twitter rules.

Work Wherever You Want Tips

Not much of a cubicle person? Luckily for you, plenty of companies nowadays aren’t either—which is why they love giving their employees the option to work remotely, from home, or even away from their desks around the office.

So if you’re craving some space, here are eight companies you should definitely check out for flexible work schedules, remote work roles, plenty of paid time off, and a lot of legroom.

 

1. VMware

A leader in cloud infrastructure, business mobility, and virtualization software, VMware entered the tech industry in 1998—offering game-changing IT solutions and simplified automated delivery systems.

Ranked 21 on Forbes’ “Top 100 Companies for Remote Jobs” (and on the list in 2014, too!), VMware is dedicated to providing employees with relaxed work schedules. The company doesn’t track which employees choose to work remotely and when they decide to do so and offers unlimited vacation time, trusting staffers to take the appropriate amount of leisure time to unwind and recharge.

 

2. DigitalOcean

DigitalOcean is a simple cloud infrastructure provider built for developers—making it easy for them to rapidly deploy, resize, and scale their production environments.

At DigitalOcean, 40% of staff works remotely. Brian Knox, a software engineer, is one of them, and he loves that he can spend time with his family and still be so involved with the company. Because Brian works from home, his days often begin with early morning dog walks and dropping his kids off at school. Around 8 AM, Brian is able to return to his home office and answer emails and then embark on a full day of programming fully refreshed.

“We have a really great remote culture here at DigitalOcean,” he says.

 

3. LivingSocial

LivingSocial is an innovative, web-based marketplace offering amazing deals—from weekend trips to gourmet dinners to one-of-a-kind events.

LivingSocial prizes itself as a company that truly cares about its employees’ well-being. One of the team’s favorite perks is the company’s multiple work-style choices: LivingSocial gives employees the option to work flexible hours in the office and take opportunities to work from home—all while staying connected to team members and the company.

“You’re your own individual here—but you have a great team here to support you,” says Angela Gardner, a marketing specialist.

How to Ask Your Boss

So you want to work from home. Maybe you’re moving further away from the office, maybe you’ve recently had a baby , or maybe you know you’d be more productive not being chained to your cube, trying to block out the ambient chatter of your co-workers nine hours each day.

The good news is, more and more companies are agreeing to part- or full-time telecommuting arrangements for their employees. So if you want to work from home, and you have a good reason, don’t be afraid to ask. I did—and here are the tips I learned for bettering your odds that you and your boss can come to a mutually beneficial arrangement.

 

1. Weigh the Potential

These days, so many of us do work that can be completed from any location with an internet connection. But—not all positions are suited to working from home, and it’s important to know that before you begin. Do you do mostly solo work, or do you interact with people from different departments on a daily basis? Are you mainly on the phone and email, or do you attend lots of in-person meetings ? Do you supervise others ? Be honest with yourself about whether or not telecommuting would really make sense for your gig. Unfortunately, your desire to work from home and the practicality of the arrangement may not always be in sync.

Next, outline your responsibilities and detail how much time you spend working on each one. Make note of the tasks that might be more difficult to complete from home, as well as those that would be easier. You’ll need to show your boss how, exactly, working from home will impact your position.

Finally, make sure you think about your timing. If you’re new on the job or gunning for a promotion , now is probably not the time to be spending your days out the office.

 

2. Formulate a Plan

Rather than just having a casual conversation, it’s better to design a formal proposal—for your boss to take the arrangement seriously, you’ll want to show that you do, too.

First, propose a specific schedule of the days and hours you will work remotely, explaining that you will be fully available by phone, email, IM, or whatever, during those hours. Your plan is also more likely to be considered if you start off asking for a temporary, part-time schedule, say, two days each week to be revisited after 60-90 days.

Then, outline the benefits of your proposed arrangement. Remember, the arguments that will appeal most to your boss are ones that have the “what’s in it for me?” factor. Sure, telecommuting may relieve you of a killer commute, but it will also mean that you can start work earlier (and more refreshed) by avoiding 60 minutes in the car each morning. Present it that way. Be prepared to show at least three ways that telecommuting will make you a better employee and a better asset to the company.

 

3. Identify and Address Concerns

Alleviating possible concerns—i.e., concerns about your productivity or IT security issues—should also be a big part of your proposal. Try to put yourself in your boss’ shoes , think about what her biggest questions or hold-ups might be, and be prepared with solutions. For example, propose face-to-face weekly catch-up meetings or weekly task lists to serve as accountability that you’re not just watching daytime TV. Or, suggest working with your IT department to ensure that your equipment is safe. Many companies also have secure VPNs (virtual private networks) that you can log into and enjoy the same security benefits as if you were in the office. Doing your research, especially on these concerns, will show that you’ve thought through every facet of the arrangement.

Good Reason Going Into the Office

Whether you’re taking the bus, driving your car, or participating in a car pool, getting to work every day is costly. Maybe you pay to park in a garage, or you commute via train. You buy a coffee on your way into work and a piece of fruit or an egg sandwich some mornings. You button up in compliance with the office’s business casual dress code, and you even sometimes put money toward networking events. According to CareerBuilder, you’re spending an average of $276 to $3,300 per year on these various commuting-related expenditures.

The national survey looked at approximately 3,000 full time employees across a range of industries in both big and small companies. Harris Poll, who conducted the survey, examined how much people spend on gas or public transportation as well as how much money they put toward daycare or petcare—or both. If you’re one of the 50% of people who buys lunch each day, the amount you spend per workday obviously goes up significantly. But even if you always make your coffee at home, diligently pack food each day, and bring your dog to work at an office that’s within walking distance of your home, you’re still not off the hook.

We’re talking about making yourself presentable, and you do that primarily through clothing, shoes, accessories. You may be able to get away with staying in your yoga pants all day on a rainy Sunday, but they likely won’t pass muster in the office. When survey participants were asked how much they spend on clothing, shoes and accessories for work in a given year, 47% said they spend $250 or more and one in 10 employees (or 13%) admitted to spending $750 or more.

Of course, even if you work for yourself or don’t report to an office ever, you’ve still got to get dressed, and you’ve still got to eat. Having a job that you’re physically required to be at doesn’t necessarily have to add to your wardrobe expenses, particularly if you know how to make smart clothing purchases, but it’s probable that it will somehow. And if you’re on the job search, well you’re likely spending money to travel to interviews, and let’s not forget about the money you’re putting toward printing copies of your resume on pretty, ecru-colored paper.

If there’s one not-quite-obvious thing that the survey results indicate, it’s that we are more in need of flexible work policies and the option to work remotely on occasion. Think of how skipping the commute just one day a week would reduce the money you spend each week on getting to and from work—and everything that’s involved in that process. Whether you’re just saving money on the cost of a subway ride, on fuel for your car, or lunch because you forgot to plan ahead (again!), there’s no question that you’ll save more. The clothing you don’t need to get dry-cleaned? The dog walker you don’t need to schedule? I’m seeing dollar signs.

While you probably don’t want to present the financial implications of getting to work to your boss—hey, you took the job—you may want to revisit or initiate a discussion on flexibility and how it’ll help you be a happier and more productive employee. The cost of commuting is simply another nod toward not going into the office Monday through Friday.

Let You Work From Home

We’ve said it before , and we’ll say it again: We know the the best work doesn’t always happen in an office between the hours of 8 and 5.

Luckily, more and more companies are embracing this and incorporating flex time and remote work arrangements into their culture, both for their longtime employees and their new hires.

So, if you’re looking for a gig that’ll let you work from home once in a while—or even all the time!—check out these seven companies, all hiring for all kinds of roles now.

 

1. TNTP

TNTP helps schools, districts, and states grow and hold on to great teachers and build systems that prioritize effective teaching in every classroom. Staff who don’t work from the small Brooklyn headquarters work in districts and home offices in over a hundred cities across the country. Many staff work from home—often with a pet curled up at their feet—while others are energized by the daily opportunity to work alongside teachers and school leaders in schools.

 

2. Worldwide 101

Worldwide101 is a virtual professional services company, supporting small businesses, entrepreneurs, and startups around the world. As virtual professionals, Worldwide101 team members have the freedom to create a different lifestyle, live where they choose, and command their own schedule. Need to drop off the kids or hit the gym before your day begins? No problem. As long as client expectations are kept, Worldwide101 encourages its team to find a work rhythm that fits them.

 

3. Hudl

Serving hundreds of youth, high school, college, and professional sports teams across the country, Hudl offers a web-based platform where coaches and athletes can collaborate to dominate the competition. The quickly growing startup is based in Lincoln, NE, but it’s happy to hire remote workers based in NY, TX, or CA for any of its openings. (Added bonuses: unlimited vacation time and an annual team trip to Vegas!).

The Reason All Work Flex Schedules Soon

Several months ago, I was talking to a college senior about her career plans. She wanted a job with flexible hours, and I asked why. The young woman said she wanted the freedom to take a short nap right after lunch when her energy flagged the most and the ability to work late at night when her brain was sharpest.

If I had made a comment like this when looking for my first job 16 years ago, I would have been laughed out of the room. But coming from a college student today, the request doesn’t sound all that strange.

According to a new study by Bentley University, 77% of Millennials say that flexible work hours would make the workplace more productive for people their age. Given their comfort with digital technology that allows them to work anytime and anywhere, this statistic hardly comes as a surprise. But as the Millennial generation becomes the majority, we can expect flex time and telecommuting to become a common workplace practice rather than a special privilege.

In fact, by around 2030, the Millennial majority will likely have done away with the 9-to-5 workday entirely. Here are four key reasons why Millennials will insist that flex-work hours happen sooner rather than later.

 

1. Work-Family Balance

Leslie Doolittle, assistant dean and director of academic support services at Bentley University, has found that work doesn’t define Millennials as much as it does older generations. Doolittle says family, friends, and making a difference in the community are more central to Millennials than they are to older people.

Given this, demands on Millennials’ personal time are bound to increase as they balance work commitments with raising young children. And, as they are closely connected to their parents, they are likely to be personally involved in caring for them as they age.

The trade-off, of course, is catching up on email at 10 PM or finishing a project on a Saturday morning to make up the time, but in my experience, that’s one that most Millennials are fine with making.

 

2. Continuing Skills Education

According to research conducted by The Hartford, 50% of Millennials desire training and development from their employer. And companies are listening. Bersin by Deloitte said that U.S. spending on corporate training grew by 15% in 2013 (the highest growth rate in seven years).

In addition, many companies are fulfilling the Millennial desire for “experience-hopping” through leadership rotation programs that allow them to test out different areas of a company. The renowned General Electric rotation program is a great example, which allows young employees to experience various functions within GE, such as finance, sales, manufacturing, and engineering.

In any case, Millennials will be spending time taking classes and working additional jobs to skill up, and some of this activity is bound to occur during the classic workday.

 

3. The Disappearing Corporate Office

By 2030, professionals will work mostly from home using super-fast data terminals. Most companies will have nixed their permanent physical office locations in favor of chains of interconnected hubs with different plans for individuals to access space. Meetings will routinely occur virtually and across geographies and time zones, rendering air travel to visit clients or partners unnecessary. And if the office isn’t necessary—why are set office hours?

Schedules for People Who Hate More Time on Job

The 9-to-5 workday is losing its appeal, and it’s not difficult to imagine why. Night owls are rarely fully awake before 11 AM, and expecting a morning person to perform at 100% productivity in 4 PM meetings is just unrealistic.

Thankfully, more and more companies see the merits of offering flex work hours to keep employees healthy and happy. Need proof? Today, we bring you a series of jobs that let you make your own schedule.

 

1. Data Engineer

Launched in 2013, indico is a powerful, comprehensive, and developer-friendly platform for building text and image machine learning software. The company’s on a mission to demystify data science and share the magic of machine learning. indico is currently looking for a scrappy developer who is comfortable with data preprocessing, data normalization, and data collection. indico gives its employees the freedom and flexibility to set their own individual work schedules, aiming to incorporate as many types of workers as possible.

 

2. Outfitter

Dedicated to designing made-to-measure menswear with a personal touch, Trumaker seeks to combine tradition with technology. The company is seeking Outfitters to work directly with customers to deliver the best in menswear. This job is perfect for fashion-savvy salespeople, style consultants, budding entrepreneurs, customer service fanatics, and “do-gooders.” Dividing their time between in-office meetings, customer visits, and work-from-home hours, Trumaker’s Outfitters are self-motivated and autonomous.

 

3. Matchmaker

 

Three Day Rule is helping people find love every day. The TDR team is made up of world-class matchmakers and dating experts who act as personal dating concierges—hand-selecting, vetting, and personally meeting every potential match before making formal introductions. While being a Matchmaker is definitely a full time job, you’ll hardly spend any of it in the office; Matchmakers spend their days hopping from coffee dates to events to meet new people, so you’ll get flexibility to decide when and where you work.

 

4. Health Care Executive Recruiter

A nationwide HR services and talent acquisition firm, Ascend’s top-notch team specializes in recruitment process outsourcing. The company’s Health Care division is looking for someone with three to five years of progressive recruiting experience and strong verbal, written, and interpersonal communication abilities. Benefits range from video conferencing software to a flexible schedule.